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Tag Archive: Dust Collectors

  1. Guide to Dust Collector Fan Sizing

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    Video Option: Guide to Fan Sizing

    Dust Collector Fan Sizing

    Industrial fans are used in dust collection systems to push dust-laden air through the filters. Fans can either force a draft (push air) or induce a draft (suck air) through the dust collector. Industrial fans are an essential component to a dust collection system so it’s important to choose the right size fan to make sure you have adequate suction to remove dust from the work environment.

    Today we will be helping you size your dust collector fan with this 5-step process. Dust collector fan sizing includes consideration of the following variables.

    • Airflow or Cubic Feet Per Minute, commonly known as CFM
    • Static Pressure
    • Environment & Location
    • Power Requirements
    • Size & Type of Dust Collector

    Airflow or CFM

    The first variable you want to consider with dust collector fan sizing is your airflow volume or CFM. CFM stands for cubic feet per minute and measures the amount of air per minute that can be moved from a space. If your CFM is unknown, you can use your pickup points and duct sizing to get started instead.

    Static Pressure

    The second variable you want to consider is your static pressure. This is defined as the pressure created by a fan or some other source to move air through a ventilation system.

    Environment & Location

    Next, take a look at your environment and location. Location, temperature, altitude, humidity, and area classification can all affect the size and type of fan that is right for your dust collection system.

    • Location – If you are in a humid location this will affect the paint finish of your fan and the fan design.
    • Temperature, Altitude, Humidity – When designing a fan these are all variables used to size the right fan wheel. This will ensure you are moving the right amount of air with the right amount of static pressure.
    • Environment & Area Classification – Make sure to find out if your environment includes any hazardous area classifications. Area classification is also important to ensure your fan meets the classification requirements.

    Power Requirements

    A 3-phase fan is commonly used in dust collection applications. You will also need to consider the power requirements of the country in which the fan will be operating. Different countries have different standards.

    Size and Type of your Dust Collection System

    Lastly, the fan you choose is determined by the size and type of your dust collection system. There are multiple models which handle different volumes.

    A top mount or collector mounted fan is typically used on cartridge collectors that handle a range of 1,500-10,000 CFM. Whereas ground mounted models are used on Baghouses and multi-module cartridge collectors where high volumes are required. Typically, up to 290,000 CFM.

    If you need help sizing your fan, you can contact one of our equipment specialists at 888-221-0312, email [email protected] or request a consultation here.

    Dust Collection Resources

    Looking for additional resources on dust collection systems? Get a free download of our Dust Collector Purchasing eBook below. It’s a comprehensive guide organized into key topics such as dust properties, volume, air to cloth ratio, dust collector styles, and more.

  2. The Importance of Static Pressure for Your Dust Collector

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    Static Pressure and Your Dust Collection System

    Static pressure is the pressure created by a fan or other source to move air through a ventilation system and plays a critical role in the design and performance of pulse jet baghouse dust collection systems. Today we are discussing the importance of static pressure, what it is, how it’s measured, and how to calculate it.

    What is Static Pressure?

    Static pressure is used to determine the fan size you’ll need for your dust collection system. If the fan you choose for your system cannot handle the static pressure, air will not be able to move properly through the system and your dust collector will not be able to remove dust effectively.

    How Static Pressure is Measured

    Like differential pressure, static pressure is measured in inches of water and sometimes will be called water column. The abbreviation for this unit is usually seen as “w.c.” and can also be seen as “w.g.”

    How to Calculate Static Pressure

    To calculate required static pressure, sum the following components of a dust collector system.

    1. To start add 0.5” Second
    2. Add the filter resistance of the collector. This will be the maximum recommended differential pressure from a dirty set of filters.
    3. In most cases you can use 6” for a baghouse and 5” for a cartridge collector. Then add 1” If an outlet duct exists in the system.
    4. Fourth, add the friction loss in the duct system coming to the dust collector. For simple runs of 100’ or less, you can use 6” as a rule of thumb.

    Please keep in mind these are general guidelines and there are many other variables to consider to make sure your system is engineered safely for your unique work environment to achieve peak performance.

    To get specific help for your application, contact one of our equipment specialists at 888-221-0312, email [email protected] or request a consultation below.

    Dust Collector Project Consultation

    Dust Collection Resources

    In search of additional dust collection resources to help you? Get a free download of our Dust Collector Purchasing eBook below. It’s a full guide organized into key topics such as dust properties, volume, air to cloth ratio, dust collector styles, and more.

    Dust Collector Purchasing eBook

    Video: Guide to Fan Sizing

    Video: Air to Cloth Ratio

    Video: How Much Does a Dust Collector Cost?

     

     

  3. Dust Collection: How to Create a World Class Customer Experience

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    Dust Collection Customer Experience Summary:

    • Industrial Dust Collection buyers place high importance on customer experience when making purchasing decisions
    • Customer experience is defined by the interactions a buyer has with a company before, during and after a sale.
    • There are five things industrial buyers value most in their purchasing experience: Product knowledge, Responsiveness, Service, Relationship, and Educational Resources

    If you were to ask most people what’s most important to them when making a purchase historically it’s come down to three things – price, quality, and service. But as buyers have become more savvy and have less time to spend on purchasing, customers now place equal if not more importance on customer experience when making dust collection purchasing decisions. In fact, 86% of buyers are willing to pay more for a great customer experience. And a recent Walker study found that by the end of 2020, customer experience will overtake price and product as the key brand differentiator.

    Customer experience is defined by the interactions a buyer has with a company before, during and after making a purchase.

    What makes a good customer experience when purchasing dust collector parts

    We recently sent a survey to our customers to understand what they currently value when making purchasing decisions and to learn where there may be gaps and opportunities for improvement.

    By understanding our buyer’s perspective it helps us build an experience tailored to the different needs and wants of our customer.
    We’ve organized our findings into five core components that customers valued most:

    Top 5 Key Components to a Customer Service Experience

    1. Expertise and Product Knowledge
    2. Responsiveness
    3. Service
    4. Relationship
    5. Educational Resources and Tools

     

    Dust Collection Purchasing Survey Graphic 1

    Dust Collection Expertise and Product Knowledge

    Expertise and product knowledge were voted as the most valued component in a dust collection customer service experience. Dust collection needs vary significantly even within the same industrial application. Today buyers value sales reps who function first as product experts who understand their specific dust collection challenges. Finding the right dust collection products that will optimize performance requires vast technical knowledge on a filters, valves, troubleshooting, dust collection engineering and more. When a sales rep delivers and establishes their expertise, this evokes trust and assurance to the customer that their buying journey and partnership will be successful.

    “I had a very good conversation with internal sales, Mark. Sharing technical knowledge and information is always helpful!” – Customer Testimonial

    Leveraging Technology to Improve Responsiveness

    Responsiveness is critical to industrial dust collection customers in order to keep their system running at peak performance. A customer may need dust collector parts for an upcoming inspection, an unexpected explosion, or replacements for broken or underperforming parts. To help solve issues before they turn into more disruptive maintenance problems, it’s vital to get a response back to the customer promptly.

    To improve response time, companies can leverage technology in innovative ways that cater to the customer.

    For example, at USAF our sales reps can be reached through multiple channels including direct phone line, email, online quote request, online chat, email nurturing and marketing automation, or via the main line where a live person will answer and direct your call immediately. Investing in several channel options allows USAF to communicate with customers quickly, using their preferred communication method.

    Further, as more of the buyers journey moves online, and as more buyers now prefer online communication over phone and face to face contact, particularly in response to COVID-19, companies need to adapt by investing in technology that will streamline the buyers journey by moving more customer interactions online. This could include any or all of the following solutions:

    • Chatbot Artificial Intelligence
    • Call Center
    • Marketing Automation & Email/SMS nurturing
    • Content marketing – Includes videos, blogs, eBooks, case studies

    “The products I purchase are specialized and by me contacting Patty and her quick response back to me works for our relationship and I wouldn’t change it. She does a fabulous job!” – Customer Testimonial

     

    Dust Collection Purchasing Survey Graphic 2

    Service

    Customers face so many choices when it comes to where they purchase dust collector parts. One key component to the dust collection customer experience is service. Great service isn’t about being short-sighted and merely searching for the next opportunity, instead it’s about prioritizing solving customer problems and focusing on long term wins.

    Today’s industrial buyers expect a service experience that combines one on one human connection with the efficiency that technology brings. An example of this could include the following touchpoints that combine technology with personal outreach:

    • Regular phone call check ins by sales rep before, during and after a sale to help the customer identify the right product and confirm successful delivery.
    • Email nurturing that includes how to advice and relevant educational information on dust collection.
    • E-Commerce product catalog for direct online sales
    • Post-sale shipping and tracking notifications by email or text
    • Post-sale customer satisfaction survey by email

    While technology has changed the way we do business in critical ways, particularly through e-commerce, the need for human connection will never go away. Companies who can master this hybrid model by finding the right balance of human vs. technology touchpoints will be the most successful in the future.

    “I think you’re already doing a great job. Bonnie is always fast to respond to my emails (always within an hour, often within minutes). On top of that she calls me periodically just to check up. She is a true professional and you should consider her a major asset to your company. Without her being my sales person I cannot guarantee that I would be even purchasing from you, there are local guys that I could buy from but I keep coming back to USAF because the service is so good.” – Jake Z.

    Relationship

    The main goal of establishing a relationship between the customer and their sales rep is to create a consistent experience across all touchpoints in the dust collection journey. The sales rep is the direct connection from the company to the customer, and to ensure the process is as smooth and positive as possible the sales rep should be a customer’s first go-to contact for orders, questions, or issues.
    Have you ever called a customer service line for a large retail or phone company? You often find yourself frustrated at being bounced around through several different departments before you even speak to the right person. A direct sales rep for a company keeps an eye on the customer’s entire journey to ensure their experience is positive and to also help mitigate any issues that may cause a bigger problem down the road.

    “Bonnie was incredibly kind, helpful, and persistent (in a good way) with our last order” – Thomas J.

    Educational Dust Collection Resources and Tools

    Expertise, product knowledge, responsiveness, service, and a relationship are all important to the dust collection customer service experience. Providing additional educational resources and tools throughout the purchasing journey is crucial to building trust and long term partnerships. Examples of successful educational resources can include:

    • eBooks that provide in depth analysis on a key topic such as dust collection design
    • Regular blog posts that answer common questions customers ask
    • 3D animated product demo videos
    • Instructional maintenance videos – includes installation, assembly, how-to and troubleshooting advice
    • Engineering drawings of products
    • Detailed spec sheets
    • Project case studies

    Here are the most popular dust collection resources USAF has complied over the years that are most valued by our customers.

    Dust Collection Resources:

  4. 5 Ways a Dust Collection System Improves Plant Efficiency and Saves Money

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    Why you may need a new dust collection system for your application and how a new system can improve operations.

    What is a Dust Collection System?

    Dust collection systems are engineered and designed to filter airborne dust particles and debris that can cause damage to plant equipment, create a hazardous work environment, and negatively impact plant production.

    Installation of a new dust collection system for your facility either by replacing an old unit or expanding your existing operation, can mean an improvement in plant maintenance, waste collection, an increase in product quality, and plant efficiency and production. A new dust collection project can be a long process. Let’s start by exploring the top 5 benefits of a dust collection system.

    Baghouse

    The Top 5 Benefits of a Dust Collection System

    1. Meet Compliance Regulations and Standards
    2. Boost Productivity
    3. Improve Product Quality
    4. Enhance Health and Safety Standards
    5. Preserve Quality of Equipment

    Meeting Compliance Regulations and Standards

    Many industrial industries in the U.S. must comply with strict air pollution control standards . These standards can be set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), OSHA, or local governing entities such as the AQMD in California.

    All agencies require industrial facilities to maintain and meet air quality standards to ensure a safe and clean environment for their plant, employees, and the surrounding community. To get started on what air permits may be needed for your specific application and location, check out our guide on dust collector air permits.

    The risks of non-compliance are health and safety risks to employees, explosions, failed inspections, and fines from agencies such as the EPA. All companies, large or small, are susceptible to these risks. Cemex, one of the largest producers of cement in the U.S. was fined by the EPA for $1.4 million in 2011 for exposing people to sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions. Cemex was also ordered to install pollution controls at its Ohio cement plant as part of the settlement.

    Enhance Production

    An accumulation of dust particles and debris on industrial equipment can interfere with overall plant performance. A dust collection system can collect these dust particles before they can interfere and compromise the health and performance of your manufacturing equipment. When your dust collection system is not performing well either due to extended wear and tear, or because your dust collector is undersized and overextended, your entire operation is at risk. Maintenance issues that go unchecked can result in an unexpected plant shut down that can close down operations for days, weeks or more. It may be difficult to know if your unit is undersized, overextended, or too old. In these cases, consult with a dust collection engineering firm and request an engineering study. By doing so you’ll get recommendations that can minimize the risk of inefficient and poorly working equipment as well as frequent and costly maintenance.

    Improve Product Quality

    For many manufacturing facilities, dust in the air can mean dust on their products. Dust can settle and accumulate on products during the manufacturing process. This has a negative impact on the quality and consistency of finished goods. A dust collector will reduce and effectively capture these dust particles, allowing for product quality to improve and maintain consistency.

    Enhance Health and Safety Standards

    Inhalation of hazardous dust affects human health and a dust collection system is vital to removing these hazards and to keep employees safe. Industries like woodworking, chemicals, iron casting, asphalt, etc. operate facilities that continuously emit hazardous contaminants, debris, gasses, and chemicals. If the hazardous dust particles and debris aren’t removed, employees inhale this polluted air and are at risk for both short-term and long-term health issues. A dust collection system can minimize this hazard. To get a better understanding of the long and short term health risks check out this guide on the health impact of dust collection systems.

    Dust Collection Safety

    Another serious risk for the company is the possibility of a fire or explosion due to an accumulation of combustible dust. There are only four conditions needed for an explosion to occur:

    4 Conditions That Create an Explosion

    • Oxygen
    • Enclosed Space
    • Ignition Source
    • Combustible Dust at the Right Concentration Level

    Do you work in an industry with combustible dust? Some of the industries that are susceptible are:

    Agriculture (grain, flour, sugar, etc.)
    • Wood
    Metals (aluminum, zinc bronze, etc.)
    • Rubber
    Chemicals (coal, sulphur, etc.)
    • Pharmaceuticals
    • Pesticides
    • Plastics
    • And More

    Learn how you can prevent a dust collector explosion with these resources we’ve gathered together here.

    Preserve the Quality and Prolong the Life of Equipment

    When dust particles and debris are created inside a manufacturing facility the contaminated dust settles onto other surfaces such as computer systems and manufacturing equipment. A buildup of dust can be harmful and result in malfunctioning equipment. This can also create unnecessary, frequent, and costly maintenance in order to keep harmful dust and debris from accumulating. With a dust collector system purifying and collecting dust particles, the chances of excessive dust build-up is minimized.

    To find out if you may benefit from an engineering study at your facility, contact a US Air Filtration engineer today. If you’re looking for additional resources on dust collection systems and the buying journey, download our free Dust Collector Purchasing Guide that touches on key topics like dust properties, volume, air-to-cloth-ratio, dust collector styles, low maintenance design features, and more.

    Video: How Much Does a Dust Collector Cost?

  5. Dust Collection Lead Times and Shipping During the Holidays

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    Dust Collection Lead Times

    There are many variables that impact dust collection lead times, particularly during a pandemic.  Whether you are returning to work, ramping up production, or are planning a change-out during  this holiday season, consider the following factors that can have an impact on your lead times.

    • Media Availability: Specialty or rare media is usually not in-stock and may need to be sourced or fabricated. Examples include media such as PPS, P84, PTFE on PTFE, Fiberglass, Basalt, and Aramid (depending on seasonal availability and media weight requested), etc.
    • Custom Features: Dust collector parts with features, dimensions, or accessories that are not common. This can include oval shaped cages, uncommon weights for filter media (e.g. Aramid 16 oz.), and more.
    • Production Schedule: Dust collector change-outs and maintenance are often seasonal depending on factors such as location and industry. Production schedules can get backed up when an influx of orders are received around the same time. For example, change-outs in the Northeast region of the U.S. are commonly scheduled in the spring or fall season. This is because a large percentage of customers want to avoid conducting change-outs in the extreme temperatures of summer and winter months.
    • Holidays: Holidays can impact everything from production to shipping. If you have a scheduled change-out during a long holiday weekend, it is best to cushion in additional time to receive and inspect your order.

    If you are returning to work after a long hiatus, we have created a return to work dust collection start-up guide and a dust collector maintenance eBook that you can download below to help get your dust collection system started safely.

    Return to Work Guide

    Dust Collector Maintenance eBook

    Dust Collection Shipping

    Shipping will continue to change and evolve, especially during the holiday season. We want to help you get what you need, when you need it. We also want to be as transparent as possible and provide the most up to date changes regarding dust collection lead times and shipping. The standard procedures and guarantees that you may have been used to with shipping, may have been modified. Below are some of the top changes that directly affect a large portion of businesses.

    UPS

    1. Changes to the UPS Service Guarantee: Effective March 26, 2020 and until further notice, the UPS Service Guarantee is suspended for all shipments from any origin to any destination. Commitment times for some services have also changed.
    2. Is UPS slowing down delivery service? The majority of UPS services continue with the same expected delivery timeframes customers have come to expect. While UPS has suspended their Service Guarantee, they are committed to providing timely and reliable service.

    For more details and answers to some of your other questions, we highly recommend checking the UPS website for the latest changes and service alerts: UPS Notices and Service Alerts

    Fedex

    1. Changes to Fedex Money Back Guarantee: Earlier this year and until further notice, FedEx suspended money-back guarantee for all FedEx Express, FedEx Ground, FedEx Freight and FedEx Office services.
    2. Do I need to sign for my package? Until further notice, Fedex has suspended Signature Required for most shipments.

    For more details and answers to some of your other questions, we highly recommend checking the Fedex website for the latest changes and news: Fedex Notices and Alerts

    Freight Carriers

    This year multiple freight carriers have minimized their workforce or altered their protocols as businesses slowly ramp up production or remain closed in response to COVID-19. Many carriers adapted quickly and implemented safety measures for their remaining staff to maintain continuity of shipping services. As freight carriers navigate through ever-evolving changes and face the upcoming holiday season, you may experience a delay in general delivery times.

    To get more detailed information about a specific carrier, please check their website directly for the latest updates or changes.

    Warehouse Management

    Should businesses’ and warehouses ramp up holiday hours, we want to help you avoid costly delays or complications. Implementing a comprehensive receiving process is one way to eliminate added time or delays to your dust collector start-up or change-out.

    To get a comprehensive receiving check list, access and download our guide below.

    Download My Free Receiving Check List

    Once the receiving process is complete, and as soon as you are able to, you can access our filter bag check list below. The check list will help guide you through the process of verifying product count, fit, and what to do should you encounter any issues.

    Download My Free Filter Bag Check List

  6. Baghouse Dust Collector FAQ

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    Table of Contents

    Baghouse dust collectors are highly efficient systems used in industrial applications that remove dirt, dust, and debris from the air.  Baghouses improve worker health and safety, protect the mechanics of industrial equipment, and maintain compliance with environmental and workplace safety regulations.

    Proper baghouse system design, installation, and maintenance are critical for minimizing plant downtime and maximizing system efficiency and longevity. Important design considerations, such as the airflow and square footage required for your system, will depend on your facility’s workspace and dust collection needs. Once a system is designed and installed, performing regular maintenance is vital for keeping it operating as efficiently as possible. Here, we address some of the most commonly asked questions about these critical systems.

    Why do you need to install a baghouse dust collector system?

    The primary reason for installing a baghouse dust collector system is to improve air quality by removing potentially harmful airborne particles, gas fumes, and other contaminants generated during manufacturing processes. Depending on the industry and the types of debris being produced, installing a dust collection system may be required in order to comply with air emission guidelines or workplace safety standards. OSHA, for example, requires industrial plants to meet certain indoor air quality standards to prevent dust-related health issues. Before designing a baghouse dust collector system, it is important to research what types of safety and air quality regulations might be applicable to your facility.

    Baghouse dust collection systems may also be installed to upgrade, improve, or enhance a facility’s existing dust control strategies. Regardless of your specific reasons for installation, it is important to implement a preventative maintenance program in order to prevent future problems and keep the system operating at optimal efficiency. General steps may include:

    • Making sure the system operates within acceptable levels by monitoring differential pressure, timing controls for pulse valves, compressed air pressure, etc.
    • Regularly emptying drums and hoppers to prevent dust build-up
    • Frequently inspecting valves, hoses, gaskets, filters, and other components and replacing them when necessary

    What type of particulate are you looking to filter?

    The type of dust being generated in your facility will influence the type of dust collector that should be used. Common types of industrial dust include:

    • Wood dust. Fine wood particles generated during woodworking processes can linger in the air, causing health issues for workers.
    • Pharmaceutical dust. The manufacturing of drugs, vitamins, and minerals generates fine powders that can be highly toxic if inhaled.
    • Food particulates. High levels of dust can be created during the processing of spices, flour, sugar, cornstarch, grains, and other dry food products.
    • Metalworking dust. Metalworking processes can create a harmful mixture of fumes and fine dust ranging from 0.01 micrometer to 1 millimeter in diameter.

    Particle size will help you determine the number of filters required and the best type of filter media for your system. While standard filters are usually sufficient for collecting moderate-to-large particles, pleated filters may be necessary to effectively capture very fine particles and fumes. It is also important to select a filter with the appropriate air-to-cloth ratio as this will influence the system’s ability to adequately protect workers from dust and contaminants.

    Low filtration efficiency will expose workers to more particles and can increase the risk of explosions. In some cases, coating the filters with a porous particulate layer, known as a precoating, can enhance filtration and improve baghouse system performance.

     

    What size of baghouse dust collector system do you need?

    Baghouses tend to be larger than other dust collector systems and are typically used for high-volume and high-temperature applications. These systems employ cylindrical fabric filter bags to capture and separate dust particles from the air. The three most common baghouse designs are:

    • Pulse jet. Pulse jet baghouses are self-cleaning filtration systems that use pulses of compressed air to clean the bags.  Cleaning occurs while the system is online.
    • Reverse air. Reverse air baghouses feature a compartmentalized design that allows for the cleaning of individual sections without shutting the entire system down.
    • Shaker baghouses clean bags by mechanically shaking the dust out of them. These are simple to operate and have a low initial investment cost. However, cleaning is performed while the system is offline.

    With their versatile and universal design, baghouses can meet a wide variety of industrial dust collection requirements. Common applications range from food production, pharmaceutical manufacturing, woodworking, and metalworking to energy utilities, chemicals, mining, and more. For optimal performance, your baghouse dust collector should be sized and designed to accommodate your facility’s air purification requirements as well as any spatial restrictions. Design considerations should include:

    • Anticipated cost
    • Type of dust being produced and expected dust volume
    • Size of area needing ventilation
    • Collector system size and required flow volume
    • Filter material

    Baghouse Filter Bag Media

    One of the most important decisions when designing a baghouse system includes selecting the right filter media.  There are a wide range of filter medias available to accommodate a variety of dust characteristics.  Temperature, dust properties such as moisture and abrasion will determine which filter media will provide the best performance and efficiency at your operation.  Here is an overview of the most common filter medias available.

    • Polyester – Polyester’s maximum continuous operating temperature is 275 degrees Fahrenheit and has good overall qualities to resist abrasion and performs well with dry temperatures.
    • PPS – PPS, also otherwise known by the proprietary name Ryton© or Procon©, is a filter bag media that is commonly used in dust collection applications where excellent resistance to acids and alkaline is required.
    • P84 – The stability of P84 filter media is a benefit to a wide variety of applications lime kilns, smelting, incinerators, coal fired boilers, and glass and ceramic industries. It can be utilized in operating conditions of a maximum 500 degrees Fahrenheit and offers a good resistance to mineral acids.
    • PTFE/Teflon – Generally used for severe environments operating at high temperatures. Industries that use PTFE filter media range from cement, steel foundries, and energy.
    • Fiberglass – Fiberglass filter media has been a leading industry standard for air filtration and applications where high temperatures are prevalent.
    • Aramid – Aramid, also known as Nomex©, is widely used in high-temperature applications because of its excellent resistance to abrasion and ability to perform at maximum continuous operating temperatures of 400 degrees Fahrenheit. 

    How much do baghouse dust collector systems cost?

    Baghouses are custom designed for each unique application and often require advanced engineering to integrate the baghouse system into the overall plant operation. As such, baghouse units typically start at $50,000 to $1 million or more.

    To get the best value from your dust collector, it is important to size the system appropriately during the design phase. This will ensure the system captures dust efficiently while reducing energy consumption.

    How do you remove dust collected by the baghouse system?

    Knowing how to properly dispose of dust once it enters the baghouse system’s hopper is essential for preventing airflow blockages, fire hazards, and other issues. The most common dust removal strategies are:

    • Enclosed box. Dust is funneled into an enclosed box under the hopper that is emptied once capacity is reached.
    • Drum/bag. Dust is collected into a detachable drum or bag, allowing for convenient disposal.
    • Rotary valve. Rotary valves allow materials to be manually or automatically moved from the collector to a disposal drum or bin.
    • Screw conveyor. In large baghouse systems, screw conveyors remove dust by transporting it from the collector to a disposal area.

    Most baghouse systems employ rotary valves or screw conveyers for automatic removal of dust.

    Baghouses have automated cleaning options with control panels that can be programmed to clean the bags anytime the differential pressure reaches an upper threshold. This enables an ongoing cycle of cleaning that occurs automatically during dust collector operation.

    Filters, filter media, and other baghouse components should also be inspected at regular intervals and replaced when necessary. Routine inspections are an essential part of preventing future problems and maintaining optimal efficiency.

    How do you enter a baghouse dust collection system for further cleaning?

    When entering the baghouse system for cleaning or maintenance, the following measures should be implemented to ensure employee safety:

    • Secure the system by powering down and shutting off valves, blowers, compressed air, etc.
    • Communicate the details of the operation to all employees
    • Wear the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE)
    • Have additional crew available to assist if needed
    • Thoroughly purge the system of combustible dust before performing any hot work (welding, grinding, etc.)
    • Establish an emergency plan for escape/retrieval

    Baghouse Dust Collector Systems from U.S. Air Filtration

    Baghouse dust collection systems provide a versatile and efficient solution for capturing particles that are released into the air during industrial activities. At U.S. Air Filtration, we design and manufacture baghouse dust collection systems to accommodate a range of operating conditions and filtration needs. Our solutions are expertly designed and constructed to optimize your facility’s productivity while minimizing maintenance and energy costs.

    For assistance with selecting or designing a baghouse dust collection system, please check out our product democontact usrequest a quote, or visit our design services page today.

  7. Dust Collectors & Filter Media for Mining & Minerals

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    Baghouse Dust Collector 2

    How to avoid a dust collector emergency in your mining and minerals facility.

    In the mining and minerals industry there a few hazards that lead to a dust collector emergencies. A top hazard this industry typically deals with are the dust particles generated at different points in their process. For example, when you deal with dust like coal and sulfur, it can form an explosive mixture with air if the right conditions are present. This explosive mixture will form in some of these typical areas at mines and quarries:

    • Crushers
    • Transfer points at conveyor belts
    • Silos

    Industrial dust collection systems control the explosive dust created during processing and helps you avoid future dust collector emergencies. Depending on your application, size restriction, and volume most customers choose between a large baghouse or compact cartridge collector.

    Most Common Dust Collectors for Mining and Minerals

    • Cartridge Collector Model 2DCP-4 and 2DCP-12
    • Baghouse Model 1309-PTHH-120-6

    Another hazard in the mining and minerals industry is the large volume of dust being produced. This dust is hard and abrasive, and with large volumes, it results in filters wearing out rapidly. This leads to frequent maintenance and filter change outs on a dust collector. Exploring other media options can help you reduce the amount of these costly change-outs. For example, filters with PTFE membrane can typically last twice as long as standard filter bags.

    Most Common Filter Media for Mining and Minerals

    Related Resources:

    How to Get the Right Dust Collector for your Application

  8. Dust Collectors and Filter Media for Food Manufacturing

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    Dust collector solutions that meet food grade regulations.

    When you need to meet food grade regulations it’s important to find the right fit for your dust collector and dust collector filters. An experienced supplier can help guide you in your research and identify the best filter media options, treatments and configuration for your baghouse or cartridge type dust collector that are food grade compliant. To help narrow down the time you spend looking for that information, we’re listing the most common dust collectors and filter media used throughout the food manufacturing industry.

    When you consider a particular dust collector or filter, you’ll want to keep in mind the characteristics of your dust properties. Typically the food manufacturing industry has dust that is small and hard to capture. For example, grain dust can be as small as 5 microns, sugars between 0.0008 – 0.005 micron, and milled flour or corn as small as 1 micron. Combustible dust in a food manufacturing facility has also been a common characteristic. To combat a dust collector emergency, you’ll want to consider the proper equipment (i.e. explosion vent) and filter media to help reduce that possibility from occurring.

    Dust collectors are available in several different options and are customizable depending on your application, volume, dust characteristics, and other specific needs. If you are looking for a modular and space friendly dust collector, a cartridge collector is your best choice. If you have higher dust loading requirements, then a baghouse will be able to fit your needs.

    Most Common Dust Collectors for Food Manufacturing

    • Cartridge Collector Model 2DCP-4 and 2DCP-8
    • Baghouse Model 68-PTHHHI

    Once you find the right dust collector, the next step is finding the right filter media. Whether you need a specific micron rating, food grade media and packaging, or stainless steel filter casing, these are the types medias being consistently used in the food manufacturing industry.

    Most Common Filter Media for Food Manufacturing

    • Spunbond Polyester
    • Polyester
    • Polypropylene
    • Oleo-phobic Finish
    Related Resources:

    How to Get the Right Dust Collector for your Application

  9. Cost Effective, Reliable Solutions for Cement, Concrete and Asphalt Plants

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    The most common concern for cement, asphalt and concrete industries is to find a dust collector that will be cost effective, run at peak efficiency, prevent them from losing product while taking up minimal space. With all of these of this in mind, what’s the most common solution to these frustrations?

    The overwhelming choice for dust control in the cement, concrete, and asphalt industry is a bin vent system with Spunbond Polyester filters. When you are trying to figure out what type of dust collector is right for your application, you’ll find that bin vents are most commonly used in applications involving silos, storage bins, or where you are moving product from one location to another. One of the greater advantages of using a bin vent is that they are very space-efficient and modular. Bin vents have a small footprint you can easily expand down the road. You also have the option of installing several smaller bin vents instead of one large central baghouse with ducting. Whether you need one or several, you’re still going to benefit from the top advantages of a bin vent.

    Top Benefits of a Bin Vent:Bin Vent 2D

    Ideal for product transfer applications

    Compact and Modular

    Designed for easy service and change outs

    May not require additional ductwork

    Most Common Dust Collector for Cement, Concrete, and Asphalt Applications:

    Bin Vent Model 3-PBBV-39-6.25

    Bin Vent Model 66-PTPV-84-6

    Bin Vent Model 22-PBBV-39-6.25

    Most Common Filter Media for Cement, Concrete, and Asphalt Applications:

    Pleated filters in Spunbond Polyester

     

    Related Resources:

    How to Get the Right Dust Collector for your Application

  10. Dust Collectors and Filter Medias for Chemical Applications

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    Are you installing or replacing a dust collector at your facility? You may be asking yourself “How do I choose the right dust collector?”

    To help you decide the right dust collector for your environment, we’ve gathered the most common dust collector and filter media options other customers in your industry have used over the years.

    Depending on the CFM or volume you are looking for, your size and space restrictions, and AQMD or local emissions requirements there are three types of dust collectors you would typically choose from (e.g. baghouse, cartridge collector, bin vent). Cartridge collectors are frequently used for chemical applications because of their increased efficiency at filtering fine and fume dust. Before you make your final choice, you’ll want to know how to avoid the dangers of getting an undersized dust collector and how to save on long term maintenance costs by making sure your dust collector has design features for easy maintenance.

    Regardless of which style is right for you, harsh fumes in the chemicals industry can be a detriment to the longevity of a dust collector and its filters. So one of the most common themes our customers have recently requested is for their dust collector to be fabricated from a non-corrosive material such as 304 stainless steel and titanium.

    Choosing a long-lasting filter media is the key component to saving time and money on maintenance costs. One common treatment typically used on filter bags is PTFE membrane. PTFE membrane can extend the life of your filter up to twice as long as your standard bag. Because they do need to be pulsed as frequently, you also save on energy costs . For cartridge or pleated filters, both Nanofiber and Spunbond Polyester medias are used because of superior fibers which have the ability to allow filters to reach peak efficiency much quicker than a standard media filter.

    Most Common Dust Collectors for Chemical Applications:

    • Bin Vent Model PTPBBV-39 in 304 stainless steel and Model 66-PTPBDC-39-6.25
    • Cartridge Collector Model 2DCP-4 in both 304 stainless steel and standard 10-12 gauge steel
    • Baghouse Pulse-Jet style (titanium)

    Most Common Filter Medias for Chemical Applications:

    • Cartridge Filters: Nanofiber, Spunbond Polyester, 80/20 Polyester/Cellulose blend (with or without fire retardant)
    • Filter Bags: Teflon w/ PTFE membrane, Polyester with PTFE membrane, Polyester
    Related Resources:

    How to Get the Right Dust Collector for your Application