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Tag Archive: Dust Collector Design

  1. How Much Does a Dust Collector Cost?

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    Summary: Small dust collectors for applications up to 1,000 CFM airflow cost between $100 up to $5,000 USD.  Pre-fab dust collection systems such as a bin vent or cartridge type collector cost between $10,000 and $80,000 USD. Pre-fab units acommodate airflow volumes between 2,000 and 10,000 CFM. Custom baghouse dust collectors or multiple module bin vents and cartridge collectors range between $50,000 to $1 million USD and more.

    Watch Video: How Much Does a Dust Collector Cost?

     How Much Does a Dust Collector Cost


    Table of Contents

    • What is a dust collector?
    • Dust Collector Cost
    • What Goes into the Price of Your Dust Collector
    • Dust Collector Filter Media
    • Electrical Controls or Accessories
    • Summary
    • Dust Collection Resources

    What is a Dust Collector?

    Dry dust collection systems remove airborne dust that generate during manufacturing or industrial processing.  Examples include woodworking, bulk powder processing, or food production.  Dust collectors range from small portable units to extensive custom turnkey systems.

    wen-dust-collectors-air-filtration-3403-64_1000

     

    Dust Collector Cost

    Small Dust Collector Cost

    A small dust collector that is able to handle up to 750 or 1,000 cubic feet per minute (CFM) of airflow can cost between $100 up to $5,000.  These small retail units are ideal for ventilating two to three pieces of equipment (i.e. saw, sander, planer) for a small woodworking or metalworking shop.  Small units must be set up extremely close to the collection point. This reduces static pressure and fan size.  You can find these units at an online retailer or home improvement store.

    Large Dust Collector Cost

    Larger dust collection systems are needed to ventilate large scale processing equipment. These industrial dust collectors are found in some of the following commercial applications:

    • School woodshops
    • Metalworking facilities
    • Sandblasting
    • Chemical processing
    • Food processing
    • Cement production
    • Energy production
    • Mining
    • Foundries, and many others.

    Large dust collectors are designed to handle a much larger dust loads, meet higher airflow, or specific temperature requirements.  Pre-fabricated dust collection systems like a bin vent or cartridge dust collector can handle airflow volumes between 2,000 and 10,000 cubic feet per minute (CFM).  Depending on the size of the unit, filter media, and the fan size, units can range between $10,000 – $80,000 USD.

    Custom Dust Collector Cost

    Custom turnkey, dust collection systems that require complete engineering can range between $50,000 – $1 million USD or more. These systems can include one more pulse jet baghouses, multiple modular bin vents, or several cartridge collectors.

    What Goes into the Price of your Dust Collector

    The price of your dust collection system is also determined by several variables outlined below.

    Dust LoadUSAF CleanFlo Collector

    Dust load is the amount or volume of dust in your work environment that must be cleared within a given time period.

     

    Applications with higher dust loads require more filter media to remove airborne dust particulate.  This means you’ll need a dust collector with a larger footprint. This can drive up the overall cost of your dust collection system.  Applications that generate less than one or two 55 gallon drums of dust per day are usually good candidates for a small cartridge collector or bin vent.

    Type of Dust

    The properties of your dust particulate play an important role in the following:

    • Size of your system
    • Number of filters
    • Type of filter media
    • Filter treatments your application will need.
    • Air to Cloth Ratio
    • Fan Size
    • Temperature
    • Material Handling and Conveying

    To understand the characteristics of your dust particulate, you can ask yourself the following questions.

    Product

    What is being filtered?  Does your product contain moisture or oil?  Products with moisture content greater than 25% are not suited for a dry dust collection system. Products containing hydrocarbons, including oils, may require the application of a special treatment to get optimal filtration.

    Chemistry

    Does your airstream or dust contain chemicals that could damage filter media?  Are there also acids or alkaline in the airstream?  When certain compounds are combined during processing, a chemical reaction can occur. This may require additional media treatment or coating to protect the filter bags from accelerated wear.

    Abrasion

    How abrasive is the dust that’s being filtered?  Consider the hardness of the material along with the shape of the dust.  The velocity of your airflow can also make your dust more abrasive.  Highly abrasive dust may require your housing be fabricated in stainless steel, titanium or other costly materials that are able to withstand long term wear.

    Particle Size

    What is the size of the dust particulate are you collecting? Depending on your emissions requirements, your application may require a special membrane. This would apply if your particulate is very fine.

    Is your dust combustible?

    Combustible dust can be defined as any fine material that has the ability to catch fire and explode when mixed with the proper concentration of air.  Examples of combustible dust include:

      • Wood
      • Food products such as grain, sugar, flour, starch, metals
      • Rubber
      • Chemicals
      • Pesticides
      • Plastics, and more.

    OSHA and NFPA have created guidelines to protect your plant and employees from the risks of a serious explosion.  Also, be sure to review your state and local regulations for proper identification and management of combustible dust.

    Applications filtering combustible dust will also need an explosion venting strategy. Explosion vents or Brixton latches are two common strategies that help reduce this risk. You may also need explosion isolation valves in the dust collection line. This helps prevent a deflagration from travelling back to the equipment should an event occurs inside the dust collector.

    Dust Collector Filter Media

    The type of filter media you choose impacts your system startup and long term maintenance costs. Polyester filter media is an ideal for applications with temperatures below 250°.  Polyester is affordable, highly efficient and readily available.

     

    Other common filter medias include Aramid (Nomex©), Fiberglass, PPS, P84 and Teflon.  You can add treatments to  filter media to enhance it’s efficiency and performance. Treatment for your filter is dependent on your dust characteristics.  In addition, treatments can drive up the cost of your filter bags but also extend it’s life, reduce changeout’s and drive down long term maintenance costs.

    Cartridge Dust Collector

    Air to Cloth Ratio

    Air to cloth ratio, also known as air to media ratio, is a measurement of the amount of cubic feet per minute of air passing through one square foot of filter media.

     

    You can calculate air to cloth ratio based on the size and type of dust particulate you are filtering. It’s an important element in the design and size of your dust collection system.

     

    Generally, the lower your air to cloth ratio, the better your system is at removing dust from the work environment.  However, if your air to cloth ratio is too low it can place unnecessary strain on your dust collector.  Systems that operate at a higher air to cloth ratio have a smaller footprint, size, and price than dust collectors operating at a lower air to cloth ratio.

    Fan Size

    Your dust load, CFM requirements, and static pressure measurements will determine the size of the fan that will pull dust through the system and turn the air.  Your dust collector’s location is relative to the work environment being ventilated and also impacts the size of your fan.  Systems installed close to the work environment can reduce the length of ducting and static pressure. As a result, a smaller fan may be required. The cost of a fan can vary depending on each of these factors.

    Temperature

    Applications operating above 250 degrees Fahrenheit may require more expensive filter media. These applications would need their filter to withstand long term exposure to high temperatures.

    Material Handling & Conveying

    Once your dust particulate has moved through your dust collection system and lands in the hopper, you’ll need to determine how to properly remove the dust. This ensures it doesn’t return into the airstream and plug up your system.  Drums are the most economical option. They perform well when handling waste material with light inlet dust loading.  Light inlet dust loading applies if you generate, at most, a one or two 55 gallon drum of dust per day.

     

    Applications with higher dust loading requirements or those filtering non waste product, need an advanced system to convey material. This helps prevent the drum from overfilling, which can cause dust to back up or return into the hopper.  This can also result in a processing issue that will impact your dust collector’s performance.  In these situations you may need to upgrade from a drum to a larger dumpster, rotary or dump valve.

    Rotary Valves

    Rotary valves seal the bottom of your collector. They help prevent outside air from entering the system while allowing material to be continuously emptied from the hopper.  The cost to add a rotary valve to your dust collection system can vary between $3,000 and $5,000 USD.  

    Pneumatic Conveying

    Larger applications may also require a vacuum pneumatic conveying system. Their purpose is to vacuum material from the dust collector discharge to a common point.  For example, an application with five baghouses may include a common vacuum conveying system. It would help pull discharge material from all five baghouses to one common dust collector discharge area.

    Paints, Coatings 

    Applications with high moisture levels or chemical resistance may require an upgrade to epoxy paint. It can be applied to the interior and exterior of the dust collector. This helps to reduce long term wear of the system. Facilities located near an ocean, lake, or those that process caustic chemicals would use epoxy paint.

    Unit Insulation

    Insulation may also be required if you’re airstream temperature is high and must remain above the dew point in gas form. This eliminates the risk of moisture and condensation. Airflows with high moisture content can cause performance issues with your filter bags. This can include plugging of the system and inefficient filtration. Applications requiring insulation include ventilation of exhaust air coming off boilers, burners during metal forming, and similar processes.

    Electric Controls or Accessories

    Most baghouses, cartridge collectors, and bin vents come standard with an electrical control panel. This powers your pulse cleaning system and your fan separately.  Most experts recommend to integrate your control panel into a starter panel. This powers your pulse cleaning and fan at the same time.

     

    Installation of starter panels can be done at any desired location in your plant regardless of the distance to the dust collection system. Starter panels protect your system from surges or motor damage.  While the addition of a starter panel can add to the initial cost of your system, the ease and added safety it offers make up for startup costs.

    Dust Collection Design Considerations 3

    Is an OEM Dust Collector like Torit Right For Me?

    We recently took a survey asking customers their attitude and preference towards OEM vs. aftermarket dust collection products. Here’s what we learned:

    • 15% of buyers prefer OEM dust collector parts and equipment exclusively
    • 85% of buyers like the option to purchase OEM or aftermarket dust collector parts and equipment
    • 65% of buyers who purchase aftermarket said they get the same performance as an OEM at a more affordable price and/or don’t care about having brand name components.
    • Another 50% prefer aftermarket products because they are more affordable
    • Of the 15% of buyers who only purchase OEM,  the most popular reason for choosing OEM is because they believe they can be trusted to perform long term (33%).

    If budget is not a factor for you and you are willing to pay more for OEM then this may be the right solution for you.  However if you are looking to get the same long term performance from a dust collection system as an OEM and don’t want to pay a higher price for a brand name, then a U.S. Air Filtration system may be a fit.

    Summary of Dust Collector Cost

    Selecting and pricing out a dust collection system involves consideration of each variable above.  Understanding each of these variables is critical to ensuring your dust collector performs efficiently for many years to come while also creating a clean and safe work environment. Each dust collection application is unique so it is possible that applications with very similar product characteristics or volume may require a system that is different in price and size.

     

    To ensure a successful solution, consult with a dust collection engineering and manufacturing company with extensive design and manufacturing experience.  An experienced dust collection engineering firm can help you engineer a system customized to your unique application requirements.

     

    If you have any questions unique to your application, give us a call at 888-221-0312. You can also email [email protected]. In addition, below are some related videos and resources that may help.

    Dust Collection Resources

  2. Baghouse Dust Removal Options

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    Why Baghouse Dust Removal Matters

    The right baghouse dust removal method can help minimize problems that arise due to dust build up in your hopper.

    A hopper is designed to be temporary storage for your discharge. What happens if you have excessive dust build up in your hopper? This can result in your air flow being blocked off and would cause a loss of suction throughout the dust collection system.  This can also become a hazard because it’s more opportunity for combustible dusts to create a dangerous explosion. The right dust removal method for your application can help you avoid these issues.

    Key Components

    The best method of dust removal from your hopper is dependent on some of the following components:

    • What’s your Dust Collector Type? Baghouse or Cartridge Dust Collector?
    • What are the characteristics of your dust? For example, hazardous or non-hazardous?
    • What are the loading rates of your dust?

    Baghouse Dust Removal Methods

    James Hardie Dust Collection System

    Enclosed Box

    A simple pipe system funneling dust into an enclosed box, placed underneath your hopper, is one dust removal option. Your maintenance team would be required to monitor and empty the box once capacity has been reached. Prompt removal of dust build up in your enclosed box helps prevent backup or an overflow of the box itself. Non hazardous dust and light dust loads typically use enclosed boxes.

     

    Drum or Bag

    A removable drum or bag can be a simple and easy solution to collecting and disposing dust. Once a drum or bag fills up, maintenance simply removes it by hand or forklift. Once empty, the drum or bag can then be put back into its place. This is ideal for non toxic dusts that you can easily handle.

    Rotary Valves for Baghouses

    Rotary Valve

    Rotary valves (also known as airlocks, rotary feeders, or airlock feeders) help transition material from a dust collector to a drum or bin. It seals a pressurized system against loss of air and pressure. This minimizes product loss during processing. Dust collection, pneumatic conveying, mixing, weighing, feeding, and blending use rotary valves. Larger baghouse systems with over 10,000 CFM  can also use rotary valves.

    Screw Conveyor for Baghouse Dust Collectors

    Large baghouses with heavy dust loads typically use screw conveyors. The screw conveyer would transport dust away from the collector, then send it to a designated disposal area. This is ideal for hazardous or reused materials.  Agriculture, mining, foundries, wood production, and chemicals are applications that use screw conveyors.

    Would you like to learn more about design considerations for a new dust collection system? For more information, download our dust collector purchasing guide.

    Dust Collection Design Considerations 7

  3. Different Baghouse Styles: Advantages and Disadvantages

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    When it comes down to finding the right dust collection system, there are a few different baghouse styles to choose from. So how do you know which one is best for you?

    Baghouse Styles

    Before we dig into the differences between some of the baghouse styles, you need to consider your dust properties and air-to-cloth ratio.  Baghouses are ideally suited for large volume applications with airflow exceeding 1,000 CFM or when high temperature applications are above 375 degrees.  In these environments, a baghouse will handle and most efficiently filter your dust laden air. 

    There are three main baghouses styles (e.g. shaker, reverse, and pulse-jet)  that are commonly used in most industrial processing and manufacturing applications.  Here’s a brief overview on the pros and cons of each to help guide you in identifying the right option for your work environment.

    Pulse Jet Baghouse 

    Pros:    Cons:
    Constantly cleaned so there is minimal dust build up in the dust collector   Requires dry compressed air
    Space Efficient   Cannot be used when there is humidity of high moisture content present
    Requires fewer bags   Cannot handle high temperatures (unless you use special filter media
         

    Reverse Air Baghouse 

    Pros:  Cons:
    Can handle high temperatures Needs to be cleaned often
    Gentle cleaning which allows for longer bag life Residual dust build up is hard to remove
    Units are typically compartmentalized into sections which allows them to be cleaned without shutting off the entire baghouse Low air-to-cloth ratio
       

    Shaker Baghouse 

    Pros:     Cons:
    Very simple to operate     Cannot handle high temperatures
    Low initial investment cost     Not space efficient (takes up a large area)
    Units are typically compartmentalized into sections which allows them to be cleaned without shutting off the entire baghouse     Energy and time sensitive 
  4. What Volume Dust Collector do I need?

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    Do you have a new dust collector project in the works and need help determining the volume? Our introduction to dust collector volume can help with that.

    Baghouse Dust Collector

    The Right Volume

    The most important consideration to factor into a new dust collector is making sure the airflow or volume of the dust collector is efficient at capturing dust and is right for your application.

    For instance, if the volume of your system is too low then your system will not filter dust as efficiently. As a result, your production, air quality and life of your collector can be shortened.  Similarly, if it is too high then your energy consumption costs can be higher and you could disrupt the process of your application. 

    Measurement of Volume

    You measure volume in cubic feet per minute or otherwise known as CFM.  CFM is a measurement of airflow related to air conditioning, heating and ventilation environments. In dust collector applications CFM measures the amount of air per minute that can be moved from a space.  

    Work environments vary dramatically from one another based on several variables. Even very similar environments can require vastly different volumes. To determine the right capabilities for a new dust collector, here are some variables to consider carefully.

    1. How are you collecting your dust?
    2. What is the size of your duct being used to collect the dust?
    3. What is the cubic feet of your work environment?
    4. Calculating volume for new installations.

    Do you need more detailed information? Download our full guide to dust collector volume below. In addition, it comes with a chart that can be helpful for your new dust collector project.

     A Guide to Dust Collector Volume

    Do you have more questions or need some help? Our equipment specialists are also available at 888-221-0312.

    Related Resources:

    Video: Air to Cloth Ratio

    Video: How Much Does a Dust Collector Cost?

    How to Get the Right Dust Collector for your Application

  5. How To Get the Right Air to Cloth Ratio for Your Dust Collector

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    Video Option: Air-to-Cloth Ratio

    Dust collector air to cloth ratio is a critical measure to ensure your system is performing efficiently. 

    How to get the right air to cloth ratio

     

    What is Air-to-Cloth Ratio?

    Air-to-Cloth ratio (a.k.a. Air-to-Media) is defined as a measurement of the amount of air passing through one square foot of filter media.

    Watch Video: Air-to-Cloth Ratio

    Air to Cloth Ratio

    Which is better, Lower or Higher Air-to-Cloth Ratio?

    Generally the lower your air-to-cloth ratio, the more effective your system is at removing dust from your work environment.

    If you operate on a higher air-to-cloth ratio, one of the common issues you will encounter is a decrease in suction. This happens because there is too much dust to capture with an insufficient amount of filter media. The filter cake on your bag eventually builds up too quickly. As a result, your air velocity and suction decreases. From there it’s a domino effect and your plant air quality decreases, filters clog quicker, and valve life expectancy is impacted. So, you’ll be performing change-outs more frequently which will cost both time and money.

    How to Calculate Air-to-Cloth Ratio

    To calculate air-to-cloth ratio, take the amount of airflow (CFM) and divide that by the amount of filter area within your dust collector. 

    For example, if you’re calculating for a cartridge collector, a typical range would be a 4:1 air to cloth ratio.  Keep in mind that environments with a large ventilation area and more pick up points require a system with a higher CFM to provide adequate suction.  Would you like to know which air to cloth ratio may be right for your project? If so, download our air to cloth guide which provides the recommended ratio for a wide variety of applications.

    Why is right Air-to-Cloth ratio important?

    What are the negative effects of improper Air-to-Cloth ratio?

    • Poor venting, therefore causing damage to equipment
    • Incur high pressure drops 
    • Impacts your air velocity
    • Excessive use of compressed air

    Related Resources:

    Filter Bag Media Quiz

    Video: Guide to Fan Sizing

    How to Get the Right Dust Collector for your Application

    What Volume Dust Collector do I need?

  6. Guide to Dust Collector Fan Sizing

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    Video Option: Guide to Fan Sizing

    Dust Collector Fan Sizing

    Industrial fans are used in dust collection systems to push dust-laden air through the filters. Fans can either force a draft (push air) or induce a draft (suck air) through the dust collector. Industrial fans are an essential component to a dust collection system so it’s important to choose the right size fan to make sure you have adequate suction to remove dust from the work environment.

    Today we will be helping you size your dust collector fan with this 5-step process. Dust collector fan sizing includes consideration of the following variables.

    • Airflow or Cubic Feet Per Minute, commonly known as CFM
    • Static Pressure
    • Environment & Location
    • Power Requirements
    • Size & Type of Dust Collector

    Airflow or CFM

    The first variable you want to consider with dust collector fan sizing is your airflow volume or CFM. CFM stands for cubic feet per minute and measures the amount of air per minute that can be moved from a space. If your CFM is unknown, you can use your pickup points and duct sizing to get started instead.

    Static Pressure

    The second variable you want to consider is your static pressure. This is defined as the pressure created by a fan or some other source to move air through a ventilation system.

    Environment & Location

    Next, take a look at your environment and location. Location, temperature, altitude, humidity, and area classification can all affect the size and type of fan that is right for your dust collection system.

    • Location – If you are in a humid location this will affect the paint finish of your fan and the fan design.
    • Temperature, Altitude, Humidity – When designing a fan these are all variables used to size the right fan wheel. This will ensure you are moving the right amount of air with the right amount of static pressure.
    • Environment & Area Classification – Make sure to find out if your environment includes any hazardous area classifications. Area classification is also important to ensure your fan meets the classification requirements.

    Power Requirements

    A 3-phase fan is commonly used in dust collection applications. You will also need to consider the power requirements of the country in which the fan will be operating. Different countries have different standards.

    Size and Type of your Dust Collection System

    Lastly, the fan you choose is determined by the size and type of your dust collection system. There are multiple models which handle different volumes.

    A top mount or collector mounted fan is typically used on cartridge collectors that handle a range of 1,500-10,000 CFM. Whereas ground mounted models are used on Baghouses and multi-module cartridge collectors where high volumes are required. Typically, up to 290,000 CFM.

    If you need help sizing your fan, you can contact one of our equipment specialists at 888-221-0312, email [email protected] or request a consultation here.

    Dust Collection Resources

    Looking for additional resources on dust collection systems? Get a free download of our Dust Collector Purchasing eBook below. It’s a comprehensive guide organized into key topics such as dust properties, volume, air to cloth ratio, dust collector styles, and more.

  7. The Importance of Static Pressure for Your Dust Collector

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    Static Pressure and Your Dust Collection System

    Static pressure is the pressure created by a fan or other source to move air through a ventilation system and plays a critical role in the design and performance of pulse jet baghouse dust collection systems. Today we are discussing the importance of static pressure, what it is, how it’s measured, and how to calculate it.

    What is Static Pressure?

    Static pressure is used to determine the fan size you’ll need for your dust collection system. If the fan you choose for your system cannot handle the static pressure, air will not be able to move properly through the system and your dust collector will not be able to remove dust effectively.

    How Static Pressure is Measured

    Like differential pressure, static pressure is measured in inches of water and sometimes will be called water column. The abbreviation for this unit is usually seen as “w.c.” and can also be seen as “w.g.”

    How to Calculate Static Pressure

    To calculate required static pressure, sum the following components of a dust collector system.

    1. To start add 0.5” Second
    2. Add the filter resistance of the collector. This will be the maximum recommended differential pressure from a dirty set of filters.
    3. In most cases you can use 6” for a baghouse and 5” for a cartridge collector. Then add 1” If an outlet duct exists in the system.
    4. Fourth, add the friction loss in the duct system coming to the dust collector. For simple runs of 100’ or less, you can use 6” as a rule of thumb.

    Please keep in mind these are general guidelines and there are many other variables to consider to make sure your system is engineered safely for your unique work environment to achieve peak performance.

    To get specific help for your application, contact one of our equipment specialists at 888-221-0312, email [email protected] or request a consultation below.

    Dust Collector Project Consultation

    Dust Collection Resources

    In search of additional dust collection resources to help you? Get a free download of our Dust Collector Purchasing eBook below. It’s a full guide organized into key topics such as dust properties, volume, air to cloth ratio, dust collector styles, and more.

    Dust Collector Purchasing eBook

    Video: Guide to Fan Sizing

    Video: Air to Cloth Ratio

    Video: How Much Does a Dust Collector Cost?

     

     

  8. Dust Collection: How to Create a World Class Customer Experience

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    Dust Collection Customer Experience Summary:

    • Industrial Dust Collection buyers place high importance on customer experience when making purchasing decisions
    • Customer experience is defined by the interactions a buyer has with a company before, during and after a sale.
    • There are five things industrial buyers value most in their purchasing experience: Product knowledge, Responsiveness, Service, Relationship, and Educational Resources

    If you were to ask most people what’s most important to them when making a purchase historically it’s come down to three things – price, quality, and service. But as buyers have become more savvy and have less time to spend on purchasing, customers now place equal if not more importance on customer experience when making dust collection purchasing decisions. In fact, 86% of buyers are willing to pay more for a great customer experience. And a recent Walker study found that by the end of 2020, customer experience will overtake price and product as the key brand differentiator.

    Customer experience is defined by the interactions a buyer has with a company before, during and after making a purchase.

    What makes a good customer experience when purchasing dust collector parts

    We recently sent a survey to our customers to understand what they currently value when making purchasing decisions and to learn where there may be gaps and opportunities for improvement.

    By understanding our buyer’s perspective it helps us build an experience tailored to the different needs and wants of our customer.
    We’ve organized our findings into five core components that customers valued most:

    Top 5 Key Components to a Customer Service Experience

    1. Expertise and Product Knowledge
    2. Responsiveness
    3. Service
    4. Relationship
    5. Educational Resources and Tools

     

    Dust Collection Purchasing Survey Graphic 1

    Dust Collection Expertise and Product Knowledge

    Expertise and product knowledge were voted as the most valued component in a dust collection customer service experience. Dust collection needs vary significantly even within the same industrial application. Today buyers value sales reps who function first as product experts who understand their specific dust collection challenges. Finding the right dust collection products that will optimize performance requires vast technical knowledge on a filters, valves, troubleshooting, dust collection engineering and more. When a sales rep delivers and establishes their expertise, this evokes trust and assurance to the customer that their buying journey and partnership will be successful.

    “I had a very good conversation with internal sales, Mark. Sharing technical knowledge and information is always helpful!” – Customer Testimonial

    Leveraging Technology to Improve Responsiveness

    Responsiveness is critical to industrial dust collection customers in order to keep their system running at peak performance. A customer may need dust collector parts for an upcoming inspection, an unexpected explosion, or replacements for broken or underperforming parts. To help solve issues before they turn into more disruptive maintenance problems, it’s vital to get a response back to the customer promptly.

    To improve response time, companies can leverage technology in innovative ways that cater to the customer.

    For example, at USAF our sales reps can be reached through multiple channels including direct phone line, email, online quote request, online chat, email nurturing and marketing automation, or via the main line where a live person will answer and direct your call immediately. Investing in several channel options allows USAF to communicate with customers quickly, using their preferred communication method.

    Further, as more of the buyers journey moves online, and as more buyers now prefer online communication over phone and face to face contact, particularly in response to COVID-19, companies need to adapt by investing in technology that will streamline the buyers journey by moving more customer interactions online. This could include any or all of the following solutions:

    • Chatbot Artificial Intelligence
    • Call Center
    • Marketing Automation & Email/SMS nurturing
    • Content marketing – Includes videos, blogs, eBooks, case studies

    “The products I purchase are specialized and by me contacting Patty and her quick response back to me works for our relationship and I wouldn’t change it. She does a fabulous job!” – Customer Testimonial

     

    Dust Collection Purchasing Survey Graphic 2

    Service

    Customers face so many choices when it comes to where they purchase dust collector parts. One key component to the dust collection customer experience is service. Great service isn’t about being short-sighted and merely searching for the next opportunity, instead it’s about prioritizing solving customer problems and focusing on long term wins.

    Today’s industrial buyers expect a service experience that combines one on one human connection with the efficiency that technology brings. An example of this could include the following touchpoints that combine technology with personal outreach:

    • Regular phone call check ins by sales rep before, during and after a sale to help the customer identify the right product and confirm successful delivery.
    • Email nurturing that includes how to advice and relevant educational information on dust collection.
    • E-Commerce product catalog for direct online sales
    • Post-sale shipping and tracking notifications by email or text
    • Post-sale customer satisfaction survey by email

    While technology has changed the way we do business in critical ways, particularly through e-commerce, the need for human connection will never go away. Companies who can master this hybrid model by finding the right balance of human vs. technology touchpoints will be the most successful in the future.

    “I think you’re already doing a great job. Bonnie is always fast to respond to my emails (always within an hour, often within minutes). On top of that she calls me periodically just to check up. She is a true professional and you should consider her a major asset to your company. Without her being my sales person I cannot guarantee that I would be even purchasing from you, there are local guys that I could buy from but I keep coming back to USAF because the service is so good.” – Jake Z.

    Relationship

    The main goal of establishing a relationship between the customer and their sales rep is to create a consistent experience across all touchpoints in the dust collection journey. The sales rep is the direct connection from the company to the customer, and to ensure the process is as smooth and positive as possible the sales rep should be a customer’s first go-to contact for orders, questions, or issues.
    Have you ever called a customer service line for a large retail or phone company? You often find yourself frustrated at being bounced around through several different departments before you even speak to the right person. A direct sales rep for a company keeps an eye on the customer’s entire journey to ensure their experience is positive and to also help mitigate any issues that may cause a bigger problem down the road.

    “Bonnie was incredibly kind, helpful, and persistent (in a good way) with our last order” – Thomas J.

    Educational Dust Collection Resources and Tools

    Expertise, product knowledge, responsiveness, service, and a relationship are all important to the dust collection customer service experience. Providing additional educational resources and tools throughout the purchasing journey is crucial to building trust and long term partnerships. Examples of successful educational resources can include:

    • eBooks that provide in depth analysis on a key topic such as dust collection design
    • Regular blog posts that answer common questions customers ask
    • 3D animated product demo videos
    • Instructional maintenance videos – includes installation, assembly, how-to and troubleshooting advice
    • Engineering drawings of products
    • Detailed spec sheets
    • Project case studies

    Here are the most popular dust collection resources USAF has complied over the years that are most valued by our customers.

    Dust Collection Resources:

  9. 5 Ways a Dust Collection System Improves Plant Efficiency and Saves Money

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    Why you may need a new dust collection system for your application and how a new system can improve operations.

    What is a Dust Collection System?

    Dust collection systems are engineered and designed to filter airborne dust particles and debris that can cause damage to plant equipment, create a hazardous work environment, and negatively impact plant production.

    Installation of a new dust collection system for your facility either by replacing an old unit or expanding your existing operation, can mean an improvement in plant maintenance, waste collection, an increase in product quality, and plant efficiency and production. A new dust collection project can be a long process. Let’s start by exploring the top 5 benefits of a dust collection system.

    Baghouse

    The Top 5 Benefits of a Dust Collection System

    1. Meet Compliance Regulations and Standards
    2. Boost Productivity
    3. Improve Product Quality
    4. Enhance Health and Safety Standards
    5. Preserve Quality of Equipment

    Meeting Compliance Regulations and Standards

    Many industrial industries in the U.S. must comply with strict air pollution control standards . These standards can be set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), OSHA, or local governing entities such as the AQMD in California.

    All agencies require industrial facilities to maintain and meet air quality standards to ensure a safe and clean environment for their plant, employees, and the surrounding community. To get started on what air permits may be needed for your specific application and location, check out our guide on dust collector air permits.

    The risks of non-compliance are health and safety risks to employees, explosions, failed inspections, and fines from agencies such as the EPA. All companies, large or small, are susceptible to these risks. Cemex, one of the largest producers of cement in the U.S. was fined by the EPA for $1.4 million in 2011 for exposing people to sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions. Cemex was also ordered to install pollution controls at its Ohio cement plant as part of the settlement.

    Enhance Production

    An accumulation of dust particles and debris on industrial equipment can interfere with overall plant performance. A dust collection system can collect these dust particles before they can interfere and compromise the health and performance of your manufacturing equipment. When your dust collection system is not performing well either due to extended wear and tear, or because your dust collector is undersized and overextended, your entire operation is at risk. Maintenance issues that go unchecked can result in an unexpected plant shut down that can close down operations for days, weeks or more. It may be difficult to know if your unit is undersized, overextended, or too old. In these cases, consult with a dust collection engineering firm and request an engineering study. By doing so you’ll get recommendations that can minimize the risk of inefficient and poorly working equipment as well as frequent and costly maintenance.

    Improve Product Quality

    For many manufacturing facilities, dust in the air can mean dust on their products. Dust can settle and accumulate on products during the manufacturing process. This has a negative impact on the quality and consistency of finished goods. A dust collector will reduce and effectively capture these dust particles, allowing for product quality to improve and maintain consistency.

    Enhance Health and Safety Standards

    Inhalation of hazardous dust affects human health and a dust collection system is vital to removing these hazards and to keep employees safe. Industries like woodworking, chemicals, iron casting, asphalt, etc. operate facilities that continuously emit hazardous contaminants, debris, gasses, and chemicals. If the hazardous dust particles and debris aren’t removed, employees inhale this polluted air and are at risk for both short-term and long-term health issues. A dust collection system can minimize this hazard. To get a better understanding of the long and short term health risks check out this guide on the health impact of dust collection systems.

    Dust Collection Safety

    Another serious risk for the company is the possibility of a fire or explosion due to an accumulation of combustible dust. There are only four conditions needed for an explosion to occur:

    4 Conditions That Create an Explosion

    • Oxygen
    • Enclosed Space
    • Ignition Source
    • Combustible Dust at the Right Concentration Level

    Do you work in an industry with combustible dust? Some of the industries that are susceptible are:

    Agriculture (grain, flour, sugar, etc.)
    • Wood
    Metals (aluminum, zinc bronze, etc.)
    • Rubber
    Chemicals (coal, sulphur, etc.)
    • Pharmaceuticals
    • Pesticides
    • Plastics
    • And More

    Learn how you can prevent a dust collector explosion with these resources we’ve gathered together here.

    Preserve the Quality and Prolong the Life of Equipment

    When dust particles and debris are created inside a manufacturing facility the contaminated dust settles onto other surfaces such as computer systems and manufacturing equipment. A buildup of dust can be harmful and result in malfunctioning equipment. This can also create unnecessary, frequent, and costly maintenance in order to keep harmful dust and debris from accumulating. With a dust collector system purifying and collecting dust particles, the chances of excessive dust build-up is minimized.

    To find out if you may benefit from an engineering study at your facility, contact a US Air Filtration engineer today. If you’re looking for additional resources on dust collection systems and the buying journey, download our free Dust Collector Purchasing Guide that touches on key topics like dust properties, volume, air-to-cloth-ratio, dust collector styles, low maintenance design features, and more.

    Video: How Much Does a Dust Collector Cost?

  10. Industrial Dust Collection System Design Considerations

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    Table of Contents

    Dust collection systems are key to maintaining appropriate conditions for employees and equipment in industrial workspaces. Dust collectors are designed and constructed to filter airborne dust and debris that can cause injury or illness to employees, damage or degrade equipment, and negatively impact plant production. In light of this important function, it is essential to choose the right dust collection system to maintain a clean, productive, and compliant work environment. Below is an overview of some of the considerations to keep in mind when designing and selecting a dust collector system.

    Dust Collection Design Considerations 1

    What Regulations Are Applicable to Dust Collectors?

    bag house and enclosure

    Certain industrial operations—e.g., chemical manufacturing, food processing, and metalworking/woodworking—generate significant amounts of airborne dust and debris. As these compounds can negatively affect human health, numerous federal, state, and local regulatory organizations—e.g., the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)—impose strict guidelines aimed toward preventing employees and passersby from exposure. One key method industry professionals employ to comply with regulations is integrating dust collector equipment in their facility to minimize dust accumulation.

    In addition to choosing the right dust collector for a facility, plants are required to attain the right permits. Air permits are legal documents provided by a local or state agency to businesses that generate above a certain level of air pollution. Air quality permits indicate the air emission guidelines—e.g., air pollution limitations, control equipment requirements, and filtration efficiencies—to which the business must comply. These guidelines may vary by municipality, country, or state.  Factors that impact air permitting requirements include plant size, application, industry, and equipment employed. As such, it is essential to communicate with the governing body closest to the facility’s location to acquire the most relevant information.

    Dust Collection Design Considerations 2

    How Does the Project Scope Affect the Ideal Type of Dust Collector?

    chemical dust collector

    The dust collection expectations of a facility significantly influence the type of dust collector that should be employed. Some of the factors to keep in mind when choosing a dust collector design include:

    Type of material. The following dust properties influence which dust collection method is most effective:

    • Size (small or large)
    • Bulk density (loose or compact)
    • Composition (acidic or basic)
    • Temperature (room temperature or elevated)
    • Moisture level (low or high)

    For example, baghouse dust collectors are suitable for sticky and hightemperature dust, while cartridge dust collectors are more appropriate for finer dust particles. If the dust is highly explosive or flammable, a spark detection system, explosion vent, or sprinkler vent may be necessary.

    • Daily dust disposal quantities. Estimated dust disposal volume and frequency helps determine which discharge method is most convenient. For example, bin vent and cartridge collectors are suitable for lower volumes of dust, while baghouse dust collectors are better suited for large volumes of dust greater than 55 gallons per day.
    • Air velocity (in FPM). The velocity requirements in a dust collector depend on the weight of dust particulate; the heavier the dust, the greater the speed required to convey dust particulate through the dust collection system.
    • Air-to-cloth ratio. also referred to as the air-to-media ratio—is the amount of air that passes through one square foot of filter media. While a lower air-to-cloth ratio is generally indicative of better filtration efficiency, optimal ratio depends on the particular dust collection system and the facility.

    Dust Collection Design Considerations 3

    What Are the Key Components of an Industrial Pulse Jet Dust Collector?

    5 most commonly replaced dust collector parts

    Dust collector systems are generally tailored to accommodate specific workspace and air purification needs. Although the exact components vary from system to system, all dust collectors consist of the following elements:

    • A blower to facilitate the movement of air through the system
    • A ductwork system to contain the dust-laden air as it moves through the system
    • A filter to capture dust
    • A filter cleaning system and discharge mechanism for dust removal
    • A dust receptacle to temporarily store the dust
    • A dust removal system to dispose of the collected dust
    • A control panel to automate each cleaning cycle

    Dust Collection Design Considerations 4

    Baghouse vs. Bin Vent vs. Cartridge Dust Collectors

    Baghouse FAQ

    As indicated above, dust collectors share many of the same basic components. However, the design and construction of these elements may vary depending on the type of dust collector. The most commonly used dust collection system for dry dust collection utilizes pulse jet technology.  Three of the most common pulse jet dust collector designs are:

    • Baghouse dust collectors: These dust collectors are large, making them ideal for use in high-volume and high-temperature dust collection applications. Baghouses rely on fabric bags to capture dust and other particles as they move through the system. Once the dust-laden air is filtered, clean air is expelled from the system.  Baghouses can accommodate airflow volumes up to one million CFM or more.
    • Bin vent dust collectors: These dust collectors are generally used to vent air during loading operations for silos and other similarly sized containers. Bin vents rely on the natural upward movement of dust and debris during loading to filter dust particulate and prevent dust from escaping the container.
    • Cartridge dust collectors: Cartridge dust collectors operate similarly to baghouse dust collectors, except they utilize cartridge filters made from pleated filter media instead of fabric bags. Their pleated filter design and finer filter media allow for better filtration of smaller dust particulates. Additionally, as they are generally more compact than baghouses, they are better suited for use in confined spaces and smaller dust loads.

    Dust Collection Design Considerations 5

    The Industrial Dust Collector Design Process

    Dust Collection Design

    When planning the design and construction of a dust collection system, it is important to have a clear understanding of how the system should perform within the facility. As indicated above, some of the factors to keep in mind include dust type, dust collection volume, air velocity, and air-to-cloth ratio. These considerations, among others, influence how the system should be designed and constructed.

    Three of the design elements affected by these factors are:

    • Dust collector ductwork serves as a transportation network for the dust-laden air within the dust collector. Ductwork size and complexity depend on the size and complexity of the system, while diameter depends on the type of dust generated and its expected volume and velocity. During the design and construction of this system element, limiting the complexity (i.e., using straight lines and minimal curved or transitional elements) and size helps ensure better system efficiency.
    • Dust removal mechanism. The ideal dust removal mechanism depends on the type of dust collector employed, the type of dust being collected, and the dust loading rate. The main mechanisms utilized include:
      • Enclosed box (i.e., a pipe system funnels dust into an enclosed box),
      • Drum or bag (i.e., the drum or bag is removed, emptied, and replaced once it is full),
      • Rotary valve (i.e., the valve allows dust to flow from the dust collector into a drum or bin)
      • Screw conveyor (i.e., a screw conveyor carries collected dust from the system to a designated storage/disposal area).
    • Explosion venting. If the dust collected by a dust collection system is combustible, appropriate measures—such as integrating explosion vents or panels, flameless venting, or spark detection and extinguishing systems—should be implemented to minimize the risk of explosion and fire outbreaks.

    Dust Collection Design Considerations 6

    How Much Does a Dust Collection System Cost?

    Dust collectors vary in size, ranging from the compact units used in small, residential or hobby workshops to the large-scale systems designed for industrial facilities. Smaller units—accommodating airflows up to 1,000 cubic feet per minute (CFM)—generally cost between $100 to $5,000, and are suited for small, residential shops, while larger units—handling airflows between 2,000 to 10,000 CFM—cost between $10,000 to $80,000, depending on the unit size, filter media, and fan size. Custom dust collection systems for highly specific or unique applications range between $50,000 to $1 million, depending on the system requirements.

    Some of the main factors that influence the cost of a dust collection system are:

    • Dust type: what is/are the dust’s composition, properties, particle size, combustibility, temperature, moisture level, etc.?
    • Dust load: how much dust must be removed from the air?
    • Filter media: what filter media is used in the system?
    • Air-to-cloth ratio: how much air should pass through the filter media?
    • Fan size: what fan size is integrated into the system?
    • Material handling and conveying: what material handling/conveying elements are integrated into the system to ensure efficient and effective dust removal?
    • Paints, coatings, or unit insulation: does the system require specialized paints, coatings, or insulation to ensure its durability?
    • Electric controls or accessories: what electrical controls and accessories are necessary for proper system function?

    Dust Collector Maintenance Considerations

    dust collector design features for easy maintenance

    Once a dust collector system is designed, constructed, and installed in a facility, it is essential to implement an adequate maintenance program to ensure it continues to provide effective and efficient performance throughout its service life. Below we outline some of the typical steps in a maintenance program.

    • Verify the system operates within acceptable ranges (e.g., air pressure to solenoid valves, timing controls for pulse valves, compartment differential pressure, etc.)
    • Check the condition of the filter media, fan bearings, damper valves, door seals and gaskets, and other system components and repair/replace them if necessary
    • Empty the dust in the hopper if necessary

    It is important to employ the proper safety measures to protect against injury during any maintenance operation. For example, when performing maintenance inside of a baghouse dust collector:

    • Ensure the unit is powered and locked down
    • Employ the proper personal protective equipment (PPE)
    • Designate a lookout
    • Communicate the specifications of the operation (what, where, when, etc.) to all other employees
    • Verify combustible dust inside of the system is within safe levels
    • Formulate an emergency escape/retrieval plan

    For additional maintenance tips, check out U.S. Air Filtration’s Dust Collector Maintenance Checklist.

    Dust Collection Design Considerations 7

    Industrial Dust Collector Systems From U.S. Air Filtration

    Dust Collection Systems

    For over 40 years, U.S. Air Filtration, Inc. has designed and manufactured standard and custom dust collection systems for customers around the world. We provide baghouse dust collectors, bin vent dust collectors, and cartridge dust collectors. To learn more about our design and manufacturing capabilities, check out our design services page or dust collector purchasing guide. For further assistance designing or selecting a dust collector for your facility, contact us or request a quote today to schedule an engineering consultation.

    For maintenance, troubleshooting and other resources, watch our video “How Much Does a Dust Collector Cost?”, subscribe to our YouTube channel, follow us on Twitter, and like us on Facebook & LinkedIn.